International Women

Mar 8, 2011
Tags: Business School, Women in B-School

Between July 2009 and June 2010, 105,900 GMAT appointments belonged to women. That’s the second time that number has topped 100,000 in GMAT history.

More importantly, that’s 40% of today’s graduate management students and tomorrow’s business leaders.

 

As we celebrate International Women’s Day, we have to tell you how excited we are to see the steady growth in women taking the GMAT exam and pursuing all kinds of business-related careers. We’re also finding that nearly half the women taking the GMAT (45.5%) are younger than 25, especially outside the United States. Women in Asia, in particular, tend to take the GMAT when they’re younger. 

We’re pretty accustomed, here at GMAC, to our research showing that b-school applicants are driven (you have to be—b-school isn’t easy). Our data on women, though, show that they move through the b-school decision process faster than men…by about a year! On average, women take about 3.5 years to move from completing their first degree to submitting their first b-school application; they’re more likely to consider graduate management education while they’re still in an undergrad program, too.

The post-graduation outlook is also pretty promising for today’s female b-schools students. When they graduated, 84% of women in the class of 2010 were employed and 93% of them said they got the type of job they wanted. 

We’re excited about this because we believe in the value of graduate management education and creating access to that value is one of our core values, but just about anyone can take the GMAT. It’s really business schools that benefit most from this upswing—more than half of the full-time programs we surveyed last year (54%) said they use special outreach programs to find more female applicants. Most executive and part-time programs were trying to recruit more women, too (45% and 42%, respectively). And because we work so closely with business schools, we’re always glad to know that the people taking the GMAT are the people business schools are seeking. 

By the way, we asked women from the classes of 2000 through 2010 whether they would recommend graduate business school to someone else. Nearly all of them (96%) said yes. 

So, what are you waiting for? Take the GMAT!

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