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User's Guide to Full-Time MBA Rankings

Key Drivers:Compensation and network

Updated significantly in 2018, Bloomberg’s ranking methodology is based on data grouped into four indexes: compensation, learning, networking, and entrepreneurship. The weights of each of these indexes is based on what students, alumni, and recruiters told them is most important in evaluating an MBA program.

Compensation is weighted the greatest at 38.5 percent. The compensation index takes into account factors like pay right after graduation, what alumni are earning, bonuses, and more. The network index is weighted the next greatest at 27.9 percent, taking into account factors like students’ interactions with alumni, quality and breadth of alumni-to-alumni interactions, and the school’s brand power with recruiters.

The learning index is weighted 23.1 percent—taking into factors like curriculum and support from instructors—and the entrepreneurship index is weighted 10.5 percent and includes factors like alumni and employer opinion of the quality of entrepreneurship training and skill outcomes.

The Bloomberg methodology is centered around four indexes: compensation, learning, networking, and entrepreneurship.

How Does Bloomberg BusinessWeek Determine Its Rankings?

The Bloomberg Business Best Business Schools rankings are calculated using a mix of data collected from corporate recruiters, alumni, business schools, and recent graduates.

Overall, the methodology is weighted 61.5 percent to opinion-based criteria and 38.5 percent to fact-based criteria.

Category Metric Name Objective Weight Description
Entrepreneurship Entrepreneurship No 0.105 Bloomberg's Entrepreneurship index takes into account factors like: Alumni opinion of whether their school took entrepreneurship seriously, alumni opinion of the quality of entrepreneurship training, and recruiter opinion of alumni entrepreneurial skills and drive.
Learning Learning No 0.231 Bloomberg's Learning index takes into account factors like: Whether the curriculum is applicable to real-world business situations; the degree of emphasis on innovation, problem-solving, and strategic thinking; the level of inspiration and support from instructors; class size; and collaboration.
Network Network No 0.279 Bloomberg's Network index takes into account factors like: The quality of networks being built by classmates; students’ interactions with alumni; successes of the career-services office; quality and breadth of alumni-to-alumni interactions; and the school’s halo, or brand power, from recruiters’ viewpoints.
Compensation Compensation Yes 0.385 Bloomberg's Compensation index takes into account factors like: Pay right after graduation, what alumni are earning, percentage of students employed three months after graduation, percentage of a class receiving a bonus, and size of bonuses.

How much do the Bloomberg BusinessWeek rankings change year to year?

Average schools' position change

With each new edition of a ranking publication, schools’ ranking position can change. Here, the last two editions of this publication are analyzed to determine its average school position change.

Schools that appeared in both of the last two editions of the Bloomberg rankings saw their ranking position change an average of +/- 9.3 positions. This is the greatest average change among the five major publications.

Among schools ranked in the top 20 of the most recent Bloomberg ranking, their ranking position changed an average of +/- 5.0 positions from the previous edition. This is the greatest average change in the top 20 among the five major publications.

publication Average Position Change among Top 20 Average Position Change overall
Bloomberg 5 9.3
The Economist 2.6 7.7
Financial Times 2.3 8.1
Forbes 2.1 3.6
USNWR 1.5 6.2
Based on GMAC analysis of the two most recently published rankings of each publication. Schools that were not ranked in both of the last two years’ rankings were excluded.
Distribution of school position change

Some ranking publications see a bigger difference in results than others year to year. Here, the last two editions of rankings are analyzed to show the distribution of schools’ position changes.

In total, 39 percent of schools included in both of the last two editions of the Bloomberg rankings saw their ranking position change ten or more positions.

Based on GMAC analysis of the two most recently published rankings of each publication. Schools that were not ranked in both of the last two years’ rankings were excluded.
0-4 5-9 10-14 15-19 20-24 25+
0.32 0.29 0.18 0.1 0.07 0.05

What Schools Does Bloomberg BusinessWeek Include?

Each ranking publication has different criteria for which schools’ MBA programs are included in their rankings.

Bloomberg creates two separate ranking lists: one of only US schools, and one of all schools. The 2018 US ranking includes 92 programs, up from 85 in 2017. The 2018 global ranking includes 124 programs total.

Minimum thresholds for survey response rates were set based on the size of a school’s graduating and alumni classes. Schools that did not meet survey thresholds were eliminated.

The 2018 US ranking includes 92 programs, up from 85 in 2017.

Who Uses the Bloomberg BusinessWeek Rankings?

The popularity and impact of different rankings vary for candidates around the world.

Twenty-six percent of global candidates use the Bloomberg ranking—the lowest global usage rate of the five major ranking publications. Bloomberg is most frequently used among candidates in the United States (32%) and Latin America (30%).

The Bloomberg ranking has the lowest impact score globally among the five major ranking publications. Its impact score is lowest in 6 of 9 world regions.

Impact score is a calculated metric. Impact score equals the percentage of candidates using a ranking publication times the percentage of candidates rating a ranking publication a 6 or 7 on a 1-7 scale of influence on their decision making. The range is 0 (no one uses a ranking publication and no one finds it influential) to 100 (everyone uses a ranking publication and everyone finds it very influential).

Country Usage Ranking Impact Ranking
Africa 0.28 6
Asia 0.25 6
Canada 0.26 8
Central & South Asia 0.24 6
E. Europe 0.19 6
Latin America 0.3 8
Middle East 0.17 4
United States 0.32 9
W. Europe 0.18 4
GMAC mba.com Prospective Students Survey. Data collected February - May 2018. Total sample size: 3,488.

Date and Frequency

Bloomberg produces US full-time MBA rankings annually in November. Each ranking is titled with the year of its publication. Their international MBA rankings typically publishes after the US ranking.

Ranking History

BusinessWeek established the first full-time MBA rankings in 1988. Bloomberg made notable changes to its methodology for the 2018 ranking.

Data Access

The interactive rankings chart available on the Bloomberg rankings webpage displays each program’s overall ranking index score and their rank in the four indexes that comprise the ranking: compensation, learning, networking, and entrepreneurship. Users can create a personalized view of the rankings by applying filters by geography, median salaries earned by graduates, industries recruit MBA hires, and salary. Each programs’ page also highlights the school-specific data, including the on-campus climate for women and other traditionally underrepresented groups.

Additional Rankings

Bloomberg annually produces two separate rankings for full-time MBA programs: one for programs based in the US, one for programs based outside of the US. Both use the same methodology. In the past, Bloomberg also published a part-time MBA ranking. Their last part-time MBA ranking was published in 2015.

School Rankings

Overall Ranking Score Compensation Ranking Networking Ranking Learning Ranking Entrepreneurship Ranking School
1 100.00 1 1 10 1 Stanford
2 92.60 3 2 38 22 Pennsylvania (Wharton)
3 91.90 2 3 53 11 Harvard
4 88.00 9 5 12 5 MIT (Sloan)
5 87.10 4 6 23 14 Chicago (Booth)
6 86.70 10 10 21 4 UC at Berkeley (Haas)
7 86.50 7 4 29 23 Columbia
8 85.50 8 8 15 36 Northwestern (Kellogg)
9 85.40 10 11 14 21 Virginia (Darden)
10 82.80 14 14 26 19 Cornell (Johnson)
11 82.60 12 18 11 34 Yale
12 82.50 19 13 4 6 Carnegie Mellon (Tepper)
13 80.80 20 12 31 7 USC (Marshall)
13 80.80 5 19 57 50 NYU (Stern)
15 80.70 13 15 33 45 Duke (Fuqua)
16 80.30 18 17 20 15 Washington (Foster)
17 80.10 15 21 37 20 UCLA (Anderson)
18 78.30 15 16 48 42 Michigan (Ross)
19 78.20 6 25 69 65 Dartmouth (Tuck)
20 75.20 23 19 28 29 Georgetown (McDonough)
21 74.80 22 23 22 38 Vanderbilt (Owen)
22 74.70 21 29 42 11 Texas at Austin (McCombs)
23 73.20 24 28 25 37 North Carolina (Kenan-Flagler)
24 72.70 17 30 55 63 Emory (Goizueta)
25 70.70 31 24 5 26 Brigham Young (Marriott)
26 69.70 25 34 52 18 Rice (Jones)
27 68.60 28 26 33 48 Georgia Tech (Scheller)
28 67.70 27 31 40 56 Indiana (Kelley)
29 67.10 29 35 18 31 Minnesota (Carlson)
30 64.60 56 9 1 17 William and Mary (Mason)
31 64.30 32 33 27 57 Notre Dame (Mendoza)
32 63.80 26 54 56 44 Washington in St. Louis (Olin)
33 63.10 47 7 17 59 Howard
34 62.50 34 32 12 73 Arizona State (Carey)
35 62.40 37 38 30 16 Maryland (Smith)
36 61.00 55 39 2 2 Utah (Eccles)
37 60.60 61 22 3 8 Texas-Dallas (Jindal)
38 59.40 30 41 70 74 Penn State (Smeal)
39 58.90 53 27 8 39 Texas Christian (Neeley)
40 58.70 46 46 9 30 UC at Davis
41 58.40 43 36 47 46 Southern Methodist (Cox)
42 57.90 39 37 62 52 Wisconsin
43 55.90 42 44 58 60 UC at Irvine (Merage)
44 54.70 37 53 51 77 Ohio State (Fisher)
45 54.30 33 73 45 71 Rochester (Simon)
46 52.00 50 66 19 40 Tulane (Freeman)
47 51.30 61 48 16 25 North Carolina State (Jenkins)
48 51.20 51 45 64 62 George Washington
49 50.40 36 60 74 89 Texas A&M (Mays)
50 49.90 48 55 60 75 Purdue (Krannert)
51 49.50 49 49 82 60 Georgia (Terry)
52 49.20 69 43 6 53 Baylor (Hankamer)
53 48.30 35 61 89 90 Michigan State (Broad)
54 46.70 54 59 61 67 Tennessee (Haslam)
55 46.30 41 65 86 87 Florida (Hough)
56 45.40 67 79 46 3 Babson (Olin)
57 44.80 45 90 65 78 Boston University (Questrom)
58 44.30 58 70 50 51 Case Western Reserve (Weatherhead)
59 43.60 40 74 84 94 Boston College (Carroll)
60 42.90 73 51 49 32 San Diego
61 42.40 44 81 91 93 Rutgers
62 41.50 60 62 76 80 Miami
62 41.50 65 87 67 24 UC at San Diego (Rady)
64 41.20 64 63 71 81 Fordham (Gabelli)
65 41.10 72 71 53 13 Pepperdine (Graziadio)
66 41.00 68 58 66 75 Northeastern (D'Amore-McKim)
67 40.70 71 68 68 10 Colorado at Boulder (Leeds)
68 39.40 58 76 72 83 Pittsburgh (Katz)
69 38.30 52 91 90 70 Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
70 37.60 57 76 88 83 Connecticut
71 37.10 85 42 36 28 Mississippi
72 36.10 70 69 79 79 American (Kogod)
73 35.70 86 47 32 26 Chapman (Argyros)
74 35.40 79 57 44 55 Cincinnati (Lindner)
75 34.90 76 52 41 91 Auburn
76 34.60 74 86 73 42 Arizona (Eller)
77 34.10 82 56 59 33 Syracuse (Whitman)
78 32.60 82 67 24 64 SUNY at Buffalo
79 31.10 75 74 83 58 Oklahoma (Price)
80 30.50 80 82 43 66 Texas Tech (Rawls)
81 29.50 92 50 35 9 Willamette (Atkinson)
82 28.90 78 88 63 72 Missouri (Trulaske)
83 27.90 66 94 93 82 Baruch (Zicklin)
84 27.40 77 71 85 85 Bentley
85 26.20 91 80 7 34 Tampa (Sykes)
86 26.00 63 93 94 92 South Carolina (Darla Moore)
87 25.60 84 85 87 47 Houston (Bauer)
88 24.50 87 78 78 41 Rochester Institute of Technology (Saunders)
89 21.90 89 64 75 88 Kentucky (Gatton)
90 20.90 90 83 81 49 San Diego State (Fowler)
91 20.70 81 89 92 86 Denver (Daniels)
92 19.20 87 92 80 67 Oregon (Lundquist)
Unranked Unranked 84 77 69 Florida International (Chapman)
Unranked Unranked 40 39 54 Hofstra (Zarb)
See rankings for Bloomberg BusinessWeek.

* Alumni survey rank is based on the 30 percent of the methodology weighted to median compensation increase (10%), job satisfaction (10%), and MBA feedback (10%).
You are not permitted to download the Content for purposes other than personal use. You shall not republish, retransmit, reproduce or use the Content for any other purpose.
Key Drivers:Employment outcomes and compensation

The Economist’s ranking methodology includes over 20 separate data indicators that fall into nine of the weighting categories detailed in this guide.

The category with the most weight is employment outcomes at 23.3 percent. This includes equal weight to the percentage of job-seeking students with job offers three months after graduation (11.7%) and the spread of industry sectors that recruited graduates (11.7%). The other key driver category for The Economist is compensation at 20.0 percent, which includes post-MBA salary (15.0%) and salary change from pre-MBA to post-MBA (5.0%).

Additional weighting categories include career services rating (11.7%), network (10.0%), faculty quality (8.8%), student selectivity (8.8%), internationalization (7.3%), student/recent graduate opinion (7.3%), and gender parity (2.9%).

The Economist's ranking methodology includes over 20 separate data indicators that fall into nine of the weighting categories detailed in this guide.

How Does The Economist Determine Its Rankings?

The Economist full-time MBA rankings are calculated using a mix of data collected from business schools, current full-time MBA students, and recent graduates.

Overall, the methodology is weighted 74.8 percent to fact-based criteria and 25.2 percent to opinion-based criteria.

Category Metric Name Objective Weight Description
Career services rating Student assessment of career services No 0.117 Current students and recent graduates’ opinion of the career services office, specifically regarding meeting their expectations and needs.
Compensation Salary change from pre-MBA to post-MBA (excluding bonuses) Yes 0.05 The difference between recent graduates’ post- and pre-MBA salaries, excluding bonuses.
Post-MBA salary Yes 0.15 Recent graduates’ post-MBA salary, excluding bonuses.
Employment outcomes Percentage of job-seeking students with a job offer three months after graduation Yes 0.117 The employment rate of the most recent class of full-time MBA graduates three months after graduation.
Spread of industry sectors that recruited most recent graduates Yes 0.117 Two measures were used to rank the diversity of recruiters: the number of industry sectors that recruited most recent graduates and how evenly those graduates were spread between these industry sectors.
Faculty quality Faculty student ratio Yes 0.029 The faculty to student ratio of the full-time MBA program.
Percentage faculty with PhD Yes 0.029 The percentage of full-time faculty in the full-time MBA program that hold a PhD.
Faculty rating by students No 0.029 Current students and recent graduates’ opinion of the quality of faculty in the full-time MBA program.
Gender parity Gender diversity Yes 0.029 Schools are given a score based on the variance of the gender split of their full-time MBA enrollment from 50 percent.
Student/recent graduate opinion Student rating of culture and classmates No 0.029 Current students and recent graduates’ rating of their full-time MBA culture and classmates.
Student rating of program and range of electives No 0.022 Current students and recent graduates’ rating of their full-time MBA program and range of electives.
Student assessment of facilities and other services No 0.022 Current students and recent graduates’ opinion of the facilities and other services of their full-time MBA program.
Internationalization Spread of regions from which students hailed Yes 0.029 Schools are given a score based on the percentage of students enrolled in the full-time MBA program from various world regions.
Range of and access to overseas exchange programs Yes 0.022 The number of overseas exchange programs lasting one month or more that full-time MBA students have access to.
Number of language courses available Yes 0.022 The number of language courses offered at no additional cost or a nominal charge to full-time MBA students.
Network Ratio of MBA alumni to current MBA students Yes 0.033 Ratio of MBA alumni to current MBA students
Number of overseas alumni chapters Yes 0.033 Number of overseas alumni chapters
Student rating of alumni network No 0.033 Current students and recent graduates’ opinion of the strength of their business school’s alumni network.
Student selectivity Average GMAT score Yes 0.035 The average GMAT scores of the most recent full-time MBA entering class.
Average number of years work experience Yes 0.026 The average number of years work experience of the most recent full-time MBA entering class.
Average salary of students before entering class Yes 0.026 Mean annual salary of incoming class prior to enrollment.

How much do the The Economist rankings change year to year?

Average schools' position change

With each new edition of a ranking publication, schools’ ranking position can change. Here, the last two editions of this publication are analyzed to determine its average school position change.

Schools that appeared in both of the last two editions of The Economist rankings saw their ranking position change an average of +/- 7.7 positions. This is the third smallest average change among the five major publications.

Among schools ranked in the top 20 of the most recent The Economist ranking, their ranking position changed an average of +/- 2.6 positions from the previous edition. This is the second largest average change among the five major publications for schools in the top 20.

publication Average Position Change among Top 20 Average Position Change overall
Bloomberg 5 9.3
The Economist 2.6 7.7
Financial Times 2.3 8.1
Forbes 2.1 3.6
USNWR 1.5 6.2
Based on GMAC analysis of the two most recently published rankings of each publication. Schools that were not ranked in both of the last two years’ rankings were excluded.
Distribution of school position change

Some ranking publications see a bigger difference in results than others year to year. Here, the last two editions of rankings are analyzed to show the distribution of schools’ position changes.

In total, 35 percent of schools included in both of the last two editions of The Economist rankings saw their ranking position change ten or more positions.

Based on GMAC analysis of the two most recently published rankings of each publication. Schools that were not ranked in both of the last two years’ rankings were excluded.
0-4 5-9 10-14 15-19 20-24 25+
0.46 0.19 0.21 0.04 0.04 0.05

What Schools Does The Economist Include?

Each ranking publication has different criteria for which schools’ MBA programs are included in their rankings.

A total of 161 full-time MBA programs were invited to participate in the 2018 ranking. The top 100 schools receive a rank. A minimum response rate of 25 percent or a minimum of 50 current students/recent graduates (whichever is lower) is required for schools to be included in the ranking. Schools must complete questionnaires for at least two consecutive years before being ranked.

Schools must complete questionnaires for at least two consecutive years before being ranked.

Who Uses the Economist Rankings?

The popularity and impact of different rankings vary for candidates around the world.

Forty percent of global candidates use The Economist ranking—the second highest global usage rate of the five major ranking publications. The Economist is most frequently used among candidates in Latin America (56%), followed by Central and South Asia (46%).

The Economist ranking has the third highest impact score globally among the five major ranking publications. It has the second highest impact score for candidates in 7 of 9 world regions, trailing FT in each.

Impact score is a calculated metric. Impact score equals the percentage of candidates using a ranking publication times the percentage of candidates rating a ranking publication a 6 or 7 on a 1-7 scale of influence on their decision making. The range is 0 (no one uses a ranking publication and no one finds it influential) to 100 (everyone uses a ranking publication and everyone finds it very influential).

Country Usage Ranking Impact Ranking
Africa 0.42 11
Asia 0.44 15
Canada 0.41 14
Central & South Asia 0.46 14
E. Europe 0.44 20
Latin America 0.56 19
Middle East 0.31 8
United States 0.33 10
W. Europe 0.44 12
GMAC mba.com Prospective Students Survey. Data collected February - May 2018. Total sample size: 3,488.

Date and Frequency

The Economist full-time MBA rankings are produced annually and published online in October. Each ranking is titled with the year of its publication.

Ranking History

The Economist has been ranking international full-time MBA programs annually since 2003. Rankings dating back five years are available on The Economist website.

The methodology is based on the results of a survey of MBA students on what factors are important to them in choosing a program. The 2018 methodology was changed slightly from the 2017 methodology.

Data Access

The complete full-time MBA rankings are publicly available on The Economist website. Users can filter the rankings by region/country and view the previous five years’ rankings using dropdown menus.

On the rankings main page, no additional data beyond a school’s ranking is viewable. Users can select the “compare schools” tool to compare up to four schools at one time by their rank in any of the individual indicators that are a part of The Economist methodology.

Additional Rankings

In addition to its annual full-time MBA rankings, The Economist also periodically produces rankings of executive MBA and Master in Management programs.

School Rankings

Rank Country School
1 United States University of Chicago – Booth School of Business
2 United States Northwestern University – Kellogg School of Management
3 United States Harvard Business School
4 United States University of Pennsylvania – Wharton School
5 United States Stanford University – Graduate School of Business
6 Spain University of Navarra – IESE Business School
7 United States University of Michigan – Stephen M. Ross School of Business
8 United States UCLA – UCLA Anderson School of Management
9 United States University of Virginia – Darden School of Business
10 United States Columbia Business School
11 United States University of California at Berkeley – Haas School of Business
12 United States Dartmouth College – Tuck School of Business
13 France HEC School of Management, Paris
14 United States Yale School of Management
15 United States Duke University – Fuqua School of Business
16 United States Massachusetts Institute of Technology – MIT Sloan School of Management
17 United States New York University – Leonard N Stern School of Business
18 United Kingdom University of Warwick – Warwick Business School
19 France INSEAD
20 United States Cornell University – Samuel Curtis Johnson Graduate School of Management
21 United States University of Florida – Warrington College of Business
22 United States University of Washington – Foster School of Business
23 Australia University of Melbourne – Melbourne Business School
24 Italy SDA Bocconi – School of Management
25 United States University of Texas at Austin – McCombs School of Business
26 United States Vanderbilt University – Owen Graduate School of Management
27 United Kingdom London Business School
28 United States University of Southern California – Marshall School of Business
29 United States Emory University – Goizueta Business School
30 United States University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill – Kenan-Flagler Business School
31 United States Georgia Institute of Technology – Scheller College of Business
32 United States University of Minnesota – Carlson School of Management
33 United States Carnegie Mellon University – The Tepper School of Business
34 France EDHEC Business School
35 Switzerland IMD - International Institute for Management Development
36 United States Indiana University – Kelley School of Business
37 United States Washington University in St Louis – Olin Business School
38 Australia The University of Queensland Business School
39 Hong Kong University of Hong Kong – Faculty of Business and Economics
40 United States Arizona State University – W. P. Carey School of Business
41 United States Rice University – Jesse H Jones Graduate School of Business
42 Germany University of Mannheim – Mannheim Business School
43 United States Hult International Business School
44 United States University of Georgia – Terry College of Business
45 United Kingdom University of Cambridge – Judge Business School
46 Spain ESADE Business School
47 United Kingdom University of Bath – School of Management
48 United States Georgetown University – Robert Emmett McDonough School of Business
49 United States University of Notre Dame – Mendoza College of Business
50 United States Pennsylvania State University – Smeal College of Business
51 United States University of Pittsburgh – Katz Graduate School of Business
52 United States University of California at Irvine – Paul Merage School of Business
53 United States Southern Methodist University – Cox School of Business
54 United States University of California at Davis – Graduate School of Management
55 United States The Ohio State University – Fisher College of Business
56 Germany European School of Management and Technology – ESMT Berlin
57 United States University of Rochester – Simon Business School
58 United States University of Wisconsin-Madison – Wisconsin School of Business
59 United States Michigan State University – Eli Broad College of Business
60 Canada Western University – Ivey Business School
61 United Kingdom Henley Business School
62 Monaco International University of Monaco
63 Spain IE University – IE Business School
64 United States Boston University – Questrom School of Business
65 United Kingdom Durham University – Durham University Business School
66 Canada York University – Schulich School of Business
67 United States Texas Christian University – Neeley School of Business
68 Singapore Nanyang Technological University – Nanyang Business School
69 China Sun Yat-sen University – Sun Yat-sen Business School
70 France EMLYON – EMLYON Business School
71 France Grenoble Ecole de Management
72 United Kingdom City University – Cass Business School
73 Singapore National University of Singapore – The NUS Business School
74 United Kingdom Cranfield School of Management
75 United Kingdom Leeds University Business School
76 United Kingdom University of Edinburgh Business School
77 Germany HHL Leipzig Graduate School of Management
78 United Kingdom University of Oxford – Saïd Business School
79 Australia Macquarie Graduate School of Management
80 United States Purdue University – Krannert Graduate School of Management
81 United States University of Maryland – Robert H Smith School of Business
82 United Kingdom Lancaster University – Lancaster University Management School
83 United States Northeastern University – D'Amore-McKim School of Business
84 United States George Washington University – School of Business
85 Germany WHU – Otto Beisheim School of Management
86 United Kingdom University of Birmingham – Birmingham Business School
87 India Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad
88 Canada Queen's University – Smith School of Business
89 Denmark Copenhagen Business School
90 France Audencia Business School
91 United Kingdom University of Nottingham – Nottingham University Business School
92 Switzerland University of St.Gallen
93 France ESSEC Business School
94 Canada Concordia University – John Molson School of Business
95 United States University of Arizona – Eller College of Management
96 United Kingdom The University of Liverpool – The University of Liverpool Management School
97 United States North Carolina State University – Poole College of Management
98 United States Case Western Reserve University – Weatherhead School of Management
99 United States Fordham University – Gabelli School of Business
100 Spain EADA Business School Barcelona
© The Economist Newspaper Limited, London (2018). See rankings for The Economist.
You are not permitted to download the Content for purposes other than personal use. You shall not republish, retransmit, reproduce or use the Content for any other purpose.
Key Drivers:Compensation and internationalization

The Financial Times ranking methodology includes 20 separate data indicators that fall into nine of the weighting categories detailed in this guide.

The methodology weights a total of 40.0 percent to measures of compensation. This is divided equally between salary increase (20.0%) and salary three years after graduation (20.0%). The other key driver category for the FT is internationalization at 20.0%. This includes international mobility (6.0%), international faculty (4.0%), international students (4.0%), international course experience (3.0%), and international board (2.0%).

Additional weighting categories include faculty quality (15.0%), employment outcomes (8.0%), gender parity (5.0%), career services rating (3.0%), employer opinion (3.0%), learning (3.0%), and return on investment (3.0%).

The Financial Times ranking methodology weights a total of 40.0 percent to measures of compensation.

How Does The Financial Times Determine Its Rankings?

The FT Global MBA rankings are calculated using a diverse mix of data collected from alumni and business schools.

Overall, the methodology is weighted 91.0 percent to fact-based criteria and 9.0 percent to opinion-based criteria.

Category Metric Name Objective Weight Description
Career services rating Careers service No 0.03 Effectiveness of the school careers service in terms of career counselling, personal development, networking events, internship search and recruitment, as rated by their alumni.
Compensation Salary three years after graduation Yes 0.2 Average MBA alumni salary three years after graduation, adjusted for variation between sectors.
Salary increase Yes 0.2 Average difference in alumni pre-MBA salary and salary three years after graduation. Based half on absolute increase and half on percentage increase.
Alumni opinion Alumni recommend No 0.03 Calculated according to alumni’s selection of three schools from which they would recruit MBA graduates.
Employment outcomes Career progress Yes 0.03 Calculated by changes in alumni job level and company size from pre-MBA to three years after graduation.
Employed at three months Yes 0.02 Employment rate of the most recent MBA graduating class three months after graduation.
Aims achieved No 0.03 A measure of the extent to which alumni fulfilled their goals or reasons for earning an MBA.
Faculty quality Faculty with doctorates Yes 0.05 Percentage of full-time faculty with a doctorate degree.
FT research rank Yes 0.1 Based on the number of articles by full-time faculty in 45 internationally recognized academic and practitioner journals, weighted by faculty size.
Gender parity Female faculty Yes 0.02 Percentage of female faculty. Schools with 50:50 gender composition receive the highest possible score.
Female students Yes 0.02 Percentage of female students currently enrolled in a school’s full-time MBA program. Schools with 50:50 gender composition receive the highest possible score.
Women on board Yes 0.01 Percentage of female members on the school’s advisory board. Schools with 50:50 gender composition receive the highest possible score.
Internationalization International faculty Yes 0.04 Calculated by citizenship diversity of faculty and the percentage whose citizenship differs from that of their business school.
International students Yes 0.04 Calculated by citizenship diversity of current full-time MBA students and the percentage whose citizenship differs from that of their business school.
International board Yes 0.02 The percentage of the board whose citizenship differs from that of the country in which the business school is based.
International mobility Yes 0.06 Based on alumni citizenship and the countries where they have worked.
International course experience Yes 0.03 Calculated by the completion of exchanges, research projects, study tours, and company internships in countries other than where the school is based by the most recent MBA graduating class.
Languages Yes 0.01 The number of extra languages required to complete a full-time MBA.
Learning Corporate social responsibility rank Yes 0.03 Proportion of teaching hours from core courses dedicated to CSR, ethics, social and environmental issues.
Return on investment Value for money Yes 0.03 Calculated using salary three years after graduation, time to degree, tuition and fees, and foregone wages while enrolled.

How much do the The Financial Times rankings change year to year?

Average schools' position change

With each new edition of a ranking publication, schools’ ranking position can change. Here, the last two editions of this publication are analyzed to determine its average school position change.

Schools that appeared in both of the last two editions of the FT rankings saw their ranking position change an average of +/- 8.1 positions. This is the second greatest average change among the five major publications.

Among schools ranked in the top 20 of the most recent FT ranking, their ranking position changed an average of +/- 2.3 positions from the previous edition. This is the third smallest average change in the top 20 among the five major publications.

publication Average Position Change among Top 20 Average Position Change overall
Bloomberg 5 9.3
The Economist 2.6 7.7
Financial Times 2.3 8.1
Forbes 2.1 3.6
USNWR 1.5 6.2
Based on GMAC analysis of the two most recently published rankings of each publication. Schools that were not ranked in both of the last two years’ rankings were excluded.
Distribution of school position change

Some ranking publications see a bigger difference in results than others year to year. Here, the last two editions of rankings are analyzed to show the distribution of schools’ position changes.

In total, 37 percent of schools included in both of the last two editions of the FT rankings saw their ranking position change ten or more positions.

Based on GMAC analysis of the two most recently published rankings of each publication. Schools that were not ranked in both of the last two years’ rankings were excluded.
0-4 5-9 10-14 15-19 20-24 25+
0.42 0.2 0.14 0.15 0.06 0.01

What Schools Does The Financial Times Include?

Each ranking publication has different criteria for which schools’ MBA programs are included in their rankings.

A total of 150 business schools took part in the 2019 FT Global MBA rankings. All included programs must be internationally accredited, at least four years old, have a minimum of 30 graduates each year, and meet the minimum response rate of 20 percent for FT’s alumni survey. The top 100 schools are included in the published rankings.

<p>A total of 150 business schools took part in the 2019 FT Global MBA rankings.</p>

Who Uses the Financial Times Rankings?

The popularity and impact of different rankings vary for candidates around the world.

Forty-three percent of global candidates use The Financial Times ranking—the highest global usage rate of the five major ranking publications. More than 2 in 3 Western European candidates use the FT rankings (68%), and it is the most frequently used ranking in every world region except the United States and Canada.

The Financial Times has the second highest impact score globally among the five major ranking publications. It has the highest impact score for candidates every world region except the United States and East and Southeast Asia, where it trails USWNR.

Impact score is a calculated metric. Impact score equals the percentage of candidates using a ranking publication times the percentage of candidates rating a ranking publication a 6 or 7 on a 1-7 scale of influence on their decision making. The range is 0 (no one uses a ranking publication and no one finds it influential) to 100 (everyone uses a ranking publication and everyone finds it very influential).

Country Usage Ranking Impact Ranking
Africa 0.48 23
Asia 0.5 17
Canada 0.36 15
Central & South Asia 0.52 18
E. Europe 0.56 27
Latin America 0.64 28
Middle East 0.4 12
United States 0.23 10
W. Europe 0.68 22
GMAC mba.com Prospective Students Survey. Data collected February - May 2018. Total sample size: 3,488.

Date and Frequency

The FT Global MBA rankings are produced annually and published online in late January. Each ranking is titled with the year of its publication.

Ranking History

The Financial Times has been ranking international full-time MBA programs annually since 1999. Every edition of the rankings is available in the rankings archives on ft.com. The ranking methodology has been tweaked slightly over the years, but overall has remained relatively consistent.

Data Access

The complete FT Global MBA ranking, including all data, is publicly available on the Financial Times website. Users can explore the data with the interactive ranking table, download the full ranking as a PDF, and view ranked school’s locations on a map.

Additional Rankings

The Financial Times produces seven rankings annually. The methodologies used for each are similar. They are published at different times throughout the year.

Global MBA
Executive MBA
Masters in Management
Masters in Finance
Executive Education
European Business Schools
Online MBA

School Rankings

Rank 3 yr avg rank Salary Percentage Increase Weighted Salary (US$) Country School
1 1 129 228,074 US Stanford Graduate School of Business
2 4 112 205,486 US Harvard Business School
3 2 104 179,661 France / Singapore Insead
4 3 114 197,267 US University of Pennsylvania: Wharton
5 8 183 174,115 China Ceibs
6 5 102 169,675 UK London Business School
7 7 126 185,861 US University of Chicago: Booth
8 10 107 188,173 US MIT: Sloan
9 8 114 184,099 US Columbia Business School
10 11 104 188,746 US University of California at Berkeley: Haas
11 14 121 172,547 US Yale School of Management
12 11 128 151,076 Spain Iese Business School
13 24 118 161,443 UK University of Oxford: Sa?d
14 13 99 170,830 US Northwestern University: Kellogg
15 16 114 173,636 US Dartmouth College: Tuck
16 11 98 163,508 UK University of Cambridge: Judge
17 20 131 153,216 Singapore National University of Singapore Business School
18 16 108 156,202 China HKUST Business School
19 20 106 142,622 France HEC Paris
19 21 111 163,808 US Duke University: Fuqua
21 19 116 148,060 Spain Esade Business School
22 22 76 151,944 Switzerland IMD Business School
23 30 114 157,437 US University of Virginia: Darden
24 26 187 156,122 India Indian School of Business
25 22 117 156,485 US New York University: Stern
26 28 108 162,985 US UCLA: Anderson
27 24 112 162,417 US Cornell University: Johnson
28 26 108 157,727 US University of Michigan: Ross
29 33 121 147,384 US Georgetown University: McDonough
30 25 126 134,036 Singapore Nanyang Business School, NTU Singapore
31 100 153,547 Spain IE Business School
31 27 124 130,628 Italy SDA Bocconi
33 39 124 178,774 India Indian Institute of Management Bangalore
34 195 110,062 China Fudan University School of Management
35 38 113 148,892 US Carnegie Mellon: Tepper
36 40 83 118,406 UK Warwick Business School
37 42 104 151,235 US University of Texas at Austin: McCombs
38 45 119 150,659 US Emory University: Goizueta
39 151 121,000 US University of Florida: Warrington
39 45 67 126,873 UK Imperial College Business School
41 38 116 131,386 China University of Hong Kong
42 49 100 131,166 South Korea Sungkyunkwan University GSB
43 133 118,415 Singapore Singapore Management University: Lee Kong Chian
43 49 122 137,568 US Indiana University: Kelley
43 61 110 120,556 UK Durham University Business School
46 51 108 147,565 US University of Southern California: Marshall
47 36 100 186,170 India Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad
48 58 129 130,056 US University of California at Irvine: Merage
49 46 107 133,519 US University of Washington: Foster
49 74 139 158,138 India Indian Institute of Management Calcutta
51 40 193 112,817 China Shanghai Jiao Tong University: Antai
52 44 112 143,651 US University of North Carolina: Kenan-Flagler
52 68 125 139,670 US Vanderbilt University: Owen
54 57 109 126,220 US Washington University: Olin
55 41 84 118,618 Netherlands Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University
56 55 103 145,121 US Rice University: Jones
57 45 110 115,689 China CUHK Business School
58 65 118 137,574 US University of Notre Dame: Mendoza
59 42 102 124,178 UK Alliance Manchester Business School
60 58 125 134,849 US Georgia Institute of Technology: Scheller
61 68 87 118,959 Australia Melbourne Business School
62 57 133 125,985 US Arizona State University: Carey
63 76 134 124,220 US Pennsylvania State University: Smeal
64 49 86 119,769 UK City, University of London: Cass
65 65 151 118,050 US Michigan State University: Broad
66 78 102 140,409 US Babson College: Olin
67 71 114 138,597 US Boston College: Carroll
68 79 124 129,676 US Boston University: Questrom
69 63 72 124,527 Switzerland University of St Gallen
70 62 82 119,671 Australia AGSM at UNSW Business School
71 69 125,176 Germany WHU ? Otto Beisheim School of Management
72 60 94 125,734 US University of Maryland: Smith
73 80 144 108,399 US University of Pittsburgh: Katz
74 81 128,166 Australia Macquarie Graduate School of Management
75 66 103 125,696 US Purdue University: Krannert
76 63 73 124,086 UK Cranfield School of Management
77 64 80 116,103 Germany Mannheim Business School
78 70 138 129,469 US Brigham Young University: Marriott
79 79 63 110,082 Germany ESMT Berlin
80 83 93,465 France EMLyon Business School
81 72 102 131,452 US Wisconsin School of Business
81 85 97 123,754 US University of Minnesota: Carlson
83 81 129 122,655 US University of Rochester: Simon
84 72 118 128,008 US Ohio State University: Fisher
85 79 93 101,232 Canada University of Toronto: Rotman
86 79 73 108,872 Portugal The Lisbon MBA
87 94 104,607 Canada McGill University: Desautels
87 84 70 106,489 UK University of Edinburgh Business School
89 84 68 116,872 Ireland University College Dublin: Smurfit
90 101 114,921 US George Washington University
91 68 88 94,496 UK Lancaster University Management School
92 95 126,181 US SMU: Cox
93 57 98,120 France Essec Business School
94 93 80 104,167 Canada Western University: Ivey
95 105 120,194 US Fordham University: Gabelli
96 161 79,956 Costa Rica / Nicaragua Incae Business School
96 94 103 99,536 US University of Texas at Dallas: Jindal
98 88 98,394 France Grenoble Ecole de Management
99 107 117,042 US Texas A & M University: Mays
100 114 115,958 US William & Mary: Mason
FT Source: FT Staff 2019 Global MBA Rankings 2019 FT.com January 2019. Used under license from The Financial Times. All Rights Reserved. See rankings for The Financial Times.
You are not permitted to download the Content for purposes other than personal use. You shall not republish, retransmit, reproduce or use the Content for any other purpose.
Key Drivers:Return on investment

The Forbes ranking methodology is based solely on the return on investment achieved by alumni five years following graduation. The only other ranking to include return on investment as a part of its methodology is The Financial Times, which weights it 3 percent.

The Forbes ranking methodology is based solely on the return on investment achieved by alumni five years following graduation.

How Does Forbes Determine Its Rankings?

The Forbes business school rankings are calculated based solely on data collected from alumni.

Overall, the methodology is weighted 100.0 percent to fact-based criteria.

Category Metric Name Objective Weight Description
Return on investment 5-year MBA gain Yes 1 Net cumulative amount the typical alumni would have earned after five years by getting their MBA versus staying in their pre-MBA career.

How much do the Forbes rankings change year to year?

Average schools' position change

With each new edition of a ranking publication, schools’ ranking position can change. Here, the last two editions of this publication are analyzed to determine its average school position change.

Schools that appeared in both of the last two editions of the Forbes rankings saw their ranking position change an average of +/- 3.6 positions. This is the smallest average change among the five major publications.

Among schools ranked in the top 20 of the most recent Forbes ranking, their ranking position changed an average of +/- 2.1 positions from the previous edition. This is the second smallest average change among the five major publications for schools in the top 20.

publication Average Position Change among Top 20 Average Position Change overall
Bloomberg 5 9.3
The Economist 2.6 7.7
Financial Times 2.3 8.1
Forbes 2.1 3.6
USNWR 1.5 6.2
Based on GMAC analysis of the two most recently published rankings of each publication. Schools that were not ranked in both of the last two years’ rankings were excluded.
Distribution of school position change

Some ranking publications see a bigger difference in results than others year to year. Here, the last two editions of rankings are analyzed to show the distribution of schools’ position changes.

In total, 67 percent of schools included in both of the last two editions of the Forbes rankings saw their ranking position change four or fewer positions.
Based on GMAC analysis of the two most recently published rankings of each publication. Schools that were not ranked in both of the last two years’ rankings were excluded.
0-4 5-9 10-14 15-19 20-24 25+
0.67 0.3 0.03 0 0 0

What Schools Does Forbes Include?

Each ranking publication has different criteria for which schools’ MBA programs are included in their rankings.

For the 2017 rankings, Forbes surveyed 17,500 alumni from more than 100 business schools and had an overall response rate of 25 percent. A minimum alumni response rate of 15 percent is required for schools to be included in the ranking. Also excluded are schools where alumni had a negative ROI after five years.

In total for 2017, 70 schools appear in their ranking of US two-year MBA programs and 17 schools appear in their ranking of international one-year MBA programs.

A minimum alumni response rate of 15 percent is required for schools to be included in the ranking.

Who Uses the Forbes Rankings?

The popularity and impact of different rankings vary for candidates around the world.

Thirty-four percent of global candidates use the Forbes ranking—the second lowest global usage rate of the five major ranking publications. Forbes is most frequently used in Central and South Asia (45%), followed by Latin America (41%).

Forbes has the second lowest impact score globally among the five major ranking publications. Its impact score ranks third for candidates in 7 of the 9 world regions.

Impact score is a calculated metric. Impact score equals the percentage of candidates using a ranking publication times the percentage of candidates rating a ranking publication a 6 or 7 on a 1-7 scale of influence on their decision making. The range is 0 (no one uses a ranking publication and no one finds it influential) to 100 (everyone uses a ranking publication and everyone finds it very influential).

Country Usage Ranking Impact Ranking
Africa 0.35 9
Asia 0.29 8
Canada 0.36 13
Central & South Asia 0.45 10
E. Europe 0.31 12
Latin America 0.41 14
Middle East 0.28 8
United States 0.36 10
W. Europe 0.26 8
GMAC mba.com Prospective Students Survey. Data collected February - May 2018. Total sample size: 3,488.

Date and Frequency

Forbes’ Best Business Schools rankings are produced annually and published online in September. Each ranking is titled with its publication year.

Ranking History

Forbes first began ranking business schools in 1999. The organization does not offer access to historical rankings or indicators. Since its first edition, the Forbes methodology has been centered on the return-on-investment of a full-time two-year MBA degree.

Data Access

The complete MBA rankings are available on the Forbes website. Users can filter the rankings by 5-year MBA gain, years to payback, pre-MBA salary, 2016 salary, tuition, and GMAT score.

Users can also view each school’s individual profile, which contains other pertinent information including enrollment, total applicants, acceptance rate, median years of work experience, top employers, job placement by function, and more.

Additional Rankings

In addition to its biennial ranking of US full-time two-year MBA programs, Forbes also publishes an biennial ranking of the top international one-year MBA programs. These rankings are also published online in September and the same return-on-investment oriented methodology is employed.

School Rankings

Rank 2016 Salary Pre-MBA Salary 5-Year MBA Gain Location School
1 $225 K $82 K $97.1 K Philadelphia, PA Pennsylvania (Wharton)
2 $215 K $80 K $92.5 K Palo Alto, CA Stanford
3 $212 K $80 K $89.6 K Boston, MA Harvard
4 $195 K $80 K $84.8 K Evanston, IL Northwestern (Kellogg)
5 $200 K $76 K $81.2 K Hanover, NH Dartmouth (Tuck)
6 $203 K $75 K $75.9 K New York, NY Columbia
7 $195 K $81 K $74.8 K Chicago, IL Chicago (Booth)
8 $201 K $81 K $72.5 K Cambridge, MA MIT (Sloan)
9 $212 K $93 K $72.4 K Berkeley, CA UC Berkeley (Haas)
10 $172 K $67 K $70.4 K Ithaca, NY Cornell (Johnson)
From Forbes, 2017 © 2017 Forbes. All rights reserved. Used by permission and protected by the Copyright Laws of the United States. The printing, copying, redistribution, or retransmission of the Content without express written permission is prohibited. See rankings for Forbes.
You are not permitted to download the Content for purposes other than personal use. You shall not republish, retransmit, reproduce or use the Content for any other purpose.
Key Drivers:Student selectivity and business school leader opinion

The U.S. News and World Report ranking methodology includes eight separate data indicators that fall into five of the weighting categories detailed in this guide.

The methodology weights a total of 25.0 percent to measures of student selectivity, which is distributed across mean GMAT and GRE scores (16.3%), mean undergraduate GPA (7.5%), and acceptance rate (1.3%). The other key driver category for U.S. News and World Report is business school leader opinion (25.0%). This is known as a school’s peer assessment score, and its based on a survey of business school deans and directors. U.S. News and World Report is the only ranking to include a measure of the opinions of business school leaders as a part of its methodology.

Additional weighting categories include employment outcomes (21.0%), employer opinion (15.0%), and compensation (14.0%).

U.S. News and World Report is the only ranking to include a measure of the opinions of business school leaders as a part of its methodology.

How Does U.S. News & World Report Determine Its Rankings?

The U.S. News Best Business Schools rankings are calculated using a mix of data collected from recent graduates, business schools, business school leaders, and corporate recruiters.

Overall, the methodology is weighted 60.0 percent to fact-based criteria and 40.0 percent to opinion-based criteria.

Category Metric Name Objective Weight Description
Business school leader opinion Peer assessment score No 0.25 Opinion-based data collected from a survey of business school deans and directors. Respondents rate other schools’ programs on a scale of 1 to 5.
Compensation Mean starting salary and bonus Yes 0.14 Starting salary and signing bonus data collected from the most recent graduating class of full-time MBA programs.
Employer opinion Recruiter assessment score No 0.15 Opinion-based data collected from a survey of corporate recruiters and company contacts. Respondents rate school’s programs on a scale of 1 to 5.
Employment outcomes Employment rates for full-time MBA program graduates at graduation Yes 0.07 Employment rate calculated for the most recent class of full-time MBA graduates based on employment status on graduation day.
Employment rates for full-time MBA program graduates three months after graduation Yes 0.14 Employment rate calculated for the most recent class of full-time MBA graduates based on employment status approximately three months after graduation.
Student selectivity Mean GMAT and GRE scores Yes 0.163 The average GMAT and GRE quantitative and verbal scores of the most recent full-time MBA entering class.
Mean undergraduate GPA Yes 0.075 The average undergraduate grade-point average of the most recent full-time MBA entering class.
Acceptance rate Yes 0.013 The percentage of applicants to the most recent full-time MBA entering class who were accepted for admission.

How much do the U.S. News & World Report rankings change year to year?

Average schools' position change

With each new edition of a ranking publication, schools’ ranking position can change. Here, the last two editions of this publication are analyzed to determine its average school position change.

Schools that appeared in both of the last two editions of the USNWR rankings saw their ranking position change an average of +/- 6.3 positions. This is the second smallest average change among the five major publications.

Among schools ranked in the top 20 of the most recent USNWR ranking, their ranking position changed an average of +/- 1.5 positions from the previous edition. This is the smallest average change among the five major publications for schools in the top 20.

publication Average Position Change among Top 20 Average Position Change overall
Bloomberg 5 9.3
The Economist 2.6 7.7
Financial Times 2.3 8.1
Forbes 2.1 3.6
USNWR 1.5 6.2
Based on GMAC analysis of the two most recently published rankings of each publication. Schools that were not ranked in both of the last two years’ rankings were excluded.
Distribution of school position change

Some ranking publications see a bigger difference in results than others year to year. Here, the last two editions of rankings are analyzed to show the distribution of schools’ position changes.

In total, 57 percent of schools included in both of the last two editions of the USNWR rankings saw their ranking position change four or fewer positions.

Based on GMAC analysis of the two most recently published rankings of each publication. Schools that were not ranked in both of the last two years’ rankings were excluded.
0-4 5-9 10-14 15-19 20-24 25+
0.57 0.16 0.13 0.05 0.07 0.01

What Schools Does U.S. News & World Report Include?

Each ranking publication has different criteria for which schools’ MBA programs are included in their rankings.

All US-based MBA programs accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business International are invited to participate. For the 2020 edition of the ranking (published in March 2019), a total of 131 programs provided enough data to be included.

The top three-fourths of these programs are numerically ranked. The bottom fourth are labeled as “rank not published” and are listed alphabetically after the ranked programs. Programs that did not provide enough data to be included or did not have a full-time program to be included are labeled as “unranked” and are listed alphabetically after the “rank not published” programs.

For the 2020 edition of the ranking, a total of 131 programs provided enough data to be included.

Who Uses the U.S. News & World Report Rankings?

The popularity and impact of different rankings vary for candidates around the world.

Thirty-seven percent of global candidates use the USNWR ranking—the third highest global usage rate of the five major ranking publications. It is much more widely used among candidates in the United States (62%) than any other world region.

USWNR has the highest impact score globally among the five major ranking publications. This is driven primarily by high impact scores among candidates in the United States and East and Southeast Asia. Its impact score is relatively low in other world regions.

Impact score is a calculated metric. Impact score equals the percentage of candidates using a ranking publication times the percentage of candidates rating a ranking publication a 6 or 7 on a 1-7 scale of influence on their decision making. The range is 0 (no one uses a ranking publication and no one finds it influential) to 100 (everyone uses a ranking publication and everyone finds it very influential).

Country Usage Ranking Impact Ranking
Africa 0.3 8
Asia 0.38 19
Canada 0.14 7
Central & South Asia 0.24 6
E. Europe 0.17 4
Latin America 0.21 7
Middle East 0.18 5
United States 0.62 25
W. Europe 0.12 5
GMAC mba.com Prospective Students Survey. Data collected February - May 2018. Total sample size: 3,488.

Date and Frequency

The U.S. News Best Business Schools rankings are produced annually and publish online in mid-March. Each ranking is titled with the following year (i.e., the rankings published in March 2019 are titled as the 2020 rankings).

Ranking History

USNWR has been ranking US full-time MBA programs annually since 1990. The organization does not offer access to historical rankings or indicators. The ranking methodology has changed little since its first edition.

Data Access

U.S. News & World Report allows free public access to their entire full-time MBA rankings, meaning visitors to their site can view each included school’s rank. To view data beyond full-time enrollment and tuition, as well as their full specialty rankings, requires the purchase of one year of unlimited “Business School Compass Access” for $29.95.

Additional Rankings

U.S. News & World Report produces rankings for a variety of additional MBA program types and specialties. These additional rankings are based only on survey responses from business school deans and directors, with the exception of the part-time MBA, Online MBA, and Online Graduate Business rankings. These specialty are also produced annually, and released concurrently with the Best Business Schools rankings in March.

MBA program types:

Executive MBA, Part-time MBA, Online MBA, Online Graduate Business

MBA Specialties:

Accounting, Entrepreneurship, Finance, Information Systems, International Business, Management, Marketing, Nonprofit, Production/Operations, Supply Chain/Logistics

School Rankings

U.S. News and World Report has not granted permission for their 2020 rankings (published March 2019) to be posted on mba.com. You can access their full ranking at www.usnews.com/best-graduate-schools/top-business-schools/mba-ranking.

You are not permitted to download the Content for purposes other than personal use. You shall not republish, retransmit, reproduce or use the Content for any other purpose.
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